A – C of Herbs

Medicinal Herbs A – C

Angus Castus Berry



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It is thought that the Chasteberry is able to both dampen and heighten sexual desire because it is an adaptogen. This means it works to normalize hormone imbalance through its effect on the adrenal glands, in this case the pituitary – in other words, it restricts hormonal excesses.

Angus Castus powder



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It is thought that the Chasteberry is able to both dampen and heighten sexual desire because it is an adaptogen. This means it works to normalize hormone imbalance through its effect on the adrenal glands, in this case the pituitary – in other words, it restricts hormonal excesses.

Agrimony herb leaf



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The word Agrimony is derived from the Greek “Argemone”, meaning “that which heals the eye”. Being abundant throughout the UK, Agrimony has been used in herbal medicine for hundreds, if not thousands of years.

Alfalfa leaf


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The word “alfalfa” comes from the Arabic phrase “al-fac-facah” meaning “father of all foods”. This extremely nutritious food dates back to at least 6,000 years ago

Alfalfa Powder


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The word “alfalfa” comes from the Arabic phrase “al-fac-facah” meaning “father of all foods”. This extremely nutritious food dates back to at least 6,000 years ago

Aloe Vera Resin

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Known as the “Plant of Immortality” in Ancient Egypt, Aloe Vera has an impressive history as a herbal remedy stretching back thousands of years.

Amalaki Powder


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An ancient Seer, Chyavan, was rejuvenated by Ashwinikumar by a preparation, chiefly containing fruits of Amla. Since then, Amalaki is used as a traditional household plant in India. On Amalaki Ekadashi day the Amla tree is worshipped. It is believed that Hari himself resides in this tree.

Andrographis Powder


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nicknames, “King of Bitters” or “Bile of the Earth”

Angelica Root

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According to folklore, angelica is named after an angel that appeared in plague-ridden Europe and showed a monk the angelica plant as a cure. Today, in addition to the use of angelica extracts and teas as medicine

Aronia

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This antioxidant rich berry may just be breaking into mainstream health circles as a trendy new superfood; however, it has long been known by Native Americans for its health and nutritional benefits.

Artichoke

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In traditional medicine, Artichoke was used to enhance liver function and to treat all manner of liver complaints such as jaundice and hepatitis. Artichoke leaves were used in European traditional herbal systems to stimulate the flow of bile from the liver and gall bladder, to combat diabetes symptoms and to treat heart conditions.

Ashwagandha Powder


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Ashwagandha has long been revered in the Far East for its healing, aphrodisiac and immune boosting properties.

Astragalus


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Classed as a “superior herb” in the 2,000 year old classic Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing

Balm of gilead

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The sticky buds of Balm of Gilead are extremely useful. North American Indians have long utilised their healing properties as an effective treatment for protracted coughs, whooping cough and, used like Friars Balsam, to clear the upper respiratory tract. But their real secret value lies in their excellent ability to soothe aches and pains

Barberry


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The bark and berries of the Barberry bush have a long and enduring history in many ancient medicinal systems, utilised for either medicinal or culinary purposes.

bayberry



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The early American colonists discovered the bayberry tree growing throughout the East, but they used it to make fragrant candles rather than medicines. In folk medicine, bayberry was used internally as a tea for its tonic and stimulant properties, and in the treatment of diarrhea, fever and dysentery.

Bilberries




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Bilberry is a relation of the North American blueberry, the cranberry and huckleberry, whose leaves and berries have been used traditionally for centuries.

Black cohosh




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Used for thousands of years by indigenous peoples of the Americas, the Black Cohosh root was a valuable herbal remedy for many complaints. It was primarily used to treat all manner of gynaecological problems

Black walnut




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The Native Americans used the bark, hulls and the leaf of the Black Walnut tree in their traditional medicine. It was used as a mosquito repellent, for skin disorders and the hulls were used to expel parasites from the intestines.

Bladderwrack




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Bladderwrack thrives in many of the world’s seas and oceans. Historically, people who lived close to the sea had low rates of thyroid problems due to their ingestion of iodine rich foods. These included seaweeds, and in fact Bladderwrack is one of the highest iodine containing sea vegetables known.

Blessed thistle




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Blessed Thistle is said to have obtained its name from its wonderful reputation as a heal all, even purported to cure the plague during the Middle Ages. According to the herbalist Steven Horne, thistles are warrior plants by nature – they are difficult to eradicate, hard to dig up and resistant to herbicides

Blue cohosh



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Because blue cohosh is thought to suppress muscle spasms, it’s often used in alternative medicine to soothe cramps, such as menstrual cramps and stomach cramps.

Borage



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As a medicinal herb, Borage was used to treat “melancholic” conditions – especially those relating to the heart. Borage leaves were also used for rheumatism, colds and bronchitis, and to increase lactation in women.

Brahmi




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Brahmi is named after the Hindu God Brahma, who is associated with great intellect and responsible for all “creative forces” in the world.

Buchu



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The original use of Buchu by the native peoples of southern Africa is unclear because Buchu is a general term for aromatic plants. It appears to have been applied topically, possibly as an insect repellent, and also used internally for stomach problems, rheumatism and bladder problems.

Buckthorn



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In herbal medicine, sea buckthorn has long been used to stimulate the digestive system, enhance heart and liver health, and treat skin disorders.

Burdock




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Used for centuries as a traditional remedy for a wide range of ailments, it is the root of the Burdock plant that is harvested for its medicinal qualities. Burdock Root has been traditionally used for soothing the kidneys, as a blood purifier, relieving the lymphatic system,

Calamus



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calamus was used as a stimulant for one’s appetite, or even for other appetites, or to aid one’s digestion, in North America the herb was used in the form of decoction for fevers, colics, and stomach cramps, while rhizome was chewed to help ease toothache.

Cascara sagrada



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Cascara Sagrada translates from Spanish as “sacred bark” and is thought to have acquired this name from Spanish priests who noted its similarity to the wood used for the ark of the covenant.

Cats claw




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Cat’s Claw has been used as a traditional medicine in the Andes to treat inflammation, gastric ulcers, rheumatism, dysentery, intestinal complaints and wounds.

Catnip



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Known as “catmint” or “nep” in the Middle Ages  both people and cats loved Catnip, using it in herbal medicines formulated to treat intestinal cramps, indigestion, to cause sweating, induce menstruation, as a sedative, and to increase appetite.

Catuaba




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Catuaba bark is categorised as a stimulant and is renowned in South America – and indeed the rest of the world in recent times – as a powerful aphrodisiac. The aphrodisiac qualities of this plant were discovered by the Amazon’s Tupi Indians many centuries ago.

Centaury



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One of the classic “bitter herbs”, Centaury is a relative of the gentians and grows abundantly in the wild. It has a long history of traditional use as a digestive tonic and was also used to treat fevers – hence the name “feverwort”.

Chamomile



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One of the most ancient plants in modern use, chamomile has a history stretching back at least 3,000 years as a medicinal plant. From the Greek word for ground apple, chamomile has been used as an age old remedy by many ancient civilisations.

Chaparral



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Chaparral is claimed to help treat over 50 ailments, including cancer, arthritis, tuberculosis, skin conditions, and the common cold.

Chickweed




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Chickweed was used for a wide spectrum of conditions including, bronchitis, asthma and indigestion.

Cleavers



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Native American tribes used this herb to promote kidney health and as a remedy for gonorrhoea. It was also sometimes used by Native American women to prevent pregnancy

Cola nut



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In the 12th century Arab physicians recommended the Cola Nut for the relief of various stomach complaints, and by the 16th century it was incorporated into the “Matière Médicale” of Islamic science.

Coltsfoot




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The two traditions that have highly regarded this herb are Western Herbalism and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Both prescribe the herb as a remedy for sore throats and coughs. Even the Latin name for Coltsfoot has derived from its traditional usage with Tussil meaning ‘cough’ and ago meaning ‘depart’.

Comfrey leaf



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Taking its name from the Latin “con fera” which means to knit together, and the Old English “knitbone”, Comfrey has been prized since ancient times for its ability to help heal broken bones and damaged tissues.

Comfrey root



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Taking its name from the Latin “con fera” which means to knit together, and the Old English “knitbone”, Comfrey has been prized since ancient times for its ability to help heal broken bones and damaged tissues.

Comfrey root powder



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Taking its name from the Latin “con fera” which means to knit together, and the Old English “knitbone”, Comfrey has been prized since ancient times for its ability to help heal broken bones and damaged tissues.

Cornsilk



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The traditional use of Corn Silk can be traced back to the Mayans, Incans and Native Americans, who used it to treat bladder and urinary disorders and as a poultice for bruising and swelling. The Native Americans also showed the European settlers how to brew a healing tea from Corn Silk.

Couch grass



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Considered by gardeners as an annoying weed, Couch Grass has long been valued by herbalists for its mucilage rich rhizome. It has been used for thousands of years to treat water retention, bladder issues, kidney infections and kidney stones, sore throats and to clear congestion.

Cramp bark



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The berries were consumed as a vitamin C rich food and the bark was especially popular amongst Native Americans who used it for cramps and pains throughout the body.

Cranesbill



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Cranesbill is an astringent herb that can be used as a mouth rinse to soothe the pain of canker sores. The herb contains tannins that can bind up fluids and possibly relieve inflammation.

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